Connecting people with opportunities for a better Aotearoa New Zealand

The Moko Foundation was born from the generosity of New Zealanders who saw the need to support our communities. 

Our mission is to support and empower communities, with a focus on vulnerable children and young people. We uphold our vision and mission by providing opportunities in Research, Health and Education.

Research

We are continuously partnering with a range or researchers & scientists with the latest public health developments.  

Rangatahi

The Moko Foundation is committed to providing local rangatahi with opportunities in leadership, health & education. 

Education

Our Kaitaia based research centre’s overarching principle is to create new knowledge to produce better health outcomes.

Fructose in schools study - fISS

The Fructose in Schools Study (FISS) was initiated by the MOKO Foundation in 2017 to rural schools within the Far North. This research is trying to understand more about the rates of absorption of the sugar fructose across the New Zealand population and the effects this has on metabolic health outcomes. The MOKO Foundations role in this program is delivering this initiative to Far North schools as a means to educate students about the science of sugar and importance of health whilst capturing relevant data

Our Partners

Without the support of our Partners and Sponsors our work would not be possible.

If you would like to learn about how you can get involved with our foundation and help make a difference,  please contact us today.

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Project Spotlight- The Knowledge Hub

The Knowledge Hub is a project within The Moko Foundation that aims to establish partnerships & relationships between research & the community in order to increase knowledge & understanding about biomedical research & advancements. We have partnered with multiple researchers & research projects to provide community voice & engagement in research. Some of our current research partnerships include an RSV antiviral study & carriage study for pneumococcal.

So far this year we have participated in a number of community events in which we were promoting our current projects & gathering feedback & information from the community about our current research partnerships. We attended Waitangi Day where we carried our surveys about our current research partnerships in the space of rangatahi & vaping in which our Nōna Te Ao schools programme is based on. We have also attended community events hosted by local organisations such as the Muriwhenua Wellbeing festival & immunisation day run by Te Hiku Hauora.

During Matariki we hosted our Knowledge Symposium at Te Ahu Centre Kaitaia. We hosted 3 sessions across the day, a morning rangatahi session, lunch & learn community session & our evening key note session. We invited over 40 researchers & scientists from the Maurice Wilkins Centre, over 80 students from local Kura, & over 70 community members attended throughout the day across our three sessions.

Keep an eye out for more information about our current & future research partnerships as part of the Knowledge Hub at The Moko Foundation.
... See MoreSee Less

Project Spotlight- The Knowledge Hub 

The Knowledge Hub is a project within The Moko Foundation that aims to establish partnerships & relationships between research & the community in order to increase knowledge & understanding about biomedical research & advancements. We have partnered with multiple researchers & research projects to provide community voice & engagement in research. Some of our current research partnerships include an RSV antiviral study & carriage study for pneumococcal. 

So far this year we have participated in a number of community events in which we were promoting our current projects & gathering feedback & information from the community about our current research partnerships. We attended Waitangi Day where we carried our surveys about our current research partnerships in the space of rangatahi & vaping in which our Nōna Te Ao schools programme is based on. We have also attended community events hosted by local organisations such as the Muriwhenua Wellbeing festival & immunisation day run by Te Hiku Hauora. 

During Matariki we hosted our Knowledge Symposium at Te Ahu Centre Kaitaia. We hosted 3 sessions across the day, a morning rangatahi session, lunch & learn community session & our evening key note session. We invited over 40 researchers & scientists from the Maurice Wilkins Centre, over 80 students from local Kura, & over 70 community members attended throughout the day across our three sessions. 

Keep an eye out for more information about our current & future research partnerships as part of the Knowledge Hub at The Moko Foundation.

Todays spotlight is on our other Rangatahi Intern Lennox. Lennox has been with us since the beginning of the year and is giving a spotlight on how his internship has been so far with The Moko Foundation.

Kia Ora Whānau, ko Lennox Ashby tōku ingoa. My father is from Kaikohe, and my Mother is from Awarua. I grew up in Northland and graduated from Taipa Area School in 2021.
In high school I spent most of my earlier years without a clear direction or interest. The Moko Foundation was running science projects in kura throughout Te Hiku at the time, which piqued my interest in science. This lead to me beginning my Bachelor's in Biomedical Sciences at Auckland University, completing my first year in 2022. The Moko Foundation have always supported me through my high school and tertiary education. I’ve since returned back to the Far North, where I have had the opportunity through my internship with The Moko Foundation to support rangatahi programmes in the community.
As I have just passed the 6-month mark of my internship at the Moko Foundation, let me share some of what I’ve done so far…
Nōna Te Ao is the main kaupapa that I do my mahi under. We cover 3 topics during an interactive learning session in kura, all to do with health. As of now, we have worked with around 120 rangatahi across Te Hiku. Studying at University gave me knowledge around health and health concepts, but learning how to deliver this information to others was a task in itself. In the past, I would avoid situations that put me in the spotlight, such as teaching in-front of 20+ students. But after a few deliveries, my communication skills had come a long way, and so did my confidence.
The Moko Foundation Knowledge Symposium was the first time I had been a part of hosting a community event. Our team spent a significant amount of time planning to make sure things ran smooth, and efficient. We aimed to be the bridge between our community and the health-research scientists. This event offered a space for both parties to learn and share their knowledge. In a workplace that acknowledges Māori customs, working together, and making sure everyone felt welcome, was second nature to all of us. On the day, my ability to “think on my feet” was tested throughout the entire day. Watching the researchers listening just as intently as everyone else during some of the presentations was the highlight for me… other than the hangi.
... See MoreSee Less

Todays spotlight is on our other Rangatahi Intern Lennox. Lennox has been with us since the beginning of the year and is giving a spotlight on how his internship has been so far with The Moko Foundation. 

Kia Ora Whānau, ko Lennox Ashby tōku ingoa. My father is from Kaikohe, and my Mother is from Awarua. I grew up in Northland and graduated from Taipa Area School in 2021. 
In high school I spent most of my earlier years without a clear direction or interest. The Moko Foundation was running science projects in kura throughout Te Hiku at the time, which piqued my interest in science. This lead to me beginning my Bachelors in Biomedical Sciences at Auckland University, completing my first year in 2022. The Moko Foundation have always supported me through my high school and tertiary education. I’ve since returned back to the Far North, where I have had the opportunity through my internship with The Moko Foundation to support rangatahi programmes in the community.  
As I have just passed the 6-month mark of my internship at the Moko Foundation, let me share some of what I’ve done so far… 
Nōna Te Ao is the main kaupapa that I do my mahi under. We cover 3 topics during an interactive learning session in kura, all to do with health. As of now, we have worked with around 120 rangatahi across Te Hiku. Studying at University gave me knowledge around health and health concepts, but learning how to deliver this information to others was a task in itself. In the past, I would avoid situations that put me in the spotlight, such as teaching in-front of 20+ students. But after a few deliveries, my communication skills had come a long way, and so did my confidence. 
The Moko Foundation Knowledge Symposium was the first time I had been a part of hosting a community event. Our team spent a significant amount of time planning to make sure things ran smooth, and efficient. We aimed to be the bridge between our community and the health-research scientists. This event offered a space for both parties to learn and share their knowledge. In a workplace that acknowledges Māori customs, working together, and making sure everyone felt welcome, was second nature to all of us. On the day, my ability to “think on my feet” was tested throughout the entire day.  Watching the researchers listening just as intently as everyone else during some of the presentations was the highlight for me… other than the hangi.

Comment on Facebook

How inspiring

😎

Kaupapa Spotlight - Nōna Te Ao

Today we are highlighting Nōna Te Ao. Nōna Te Ao is the Moko Foundation’s 2024 pilot health science education programme, aimed at ages 15-17 and in partnership with the Maurice Wilkins Centre.

We have developed an in school programme about 3 key health areas/concerns for our rangatahi - Antibiotic Resistance, Immunisation and Vaping & Addictions. Our team has been rolling this out through kura across Te Hiku this past term with over 100 tauira completing our programme.

30 tauira from Te Hiku will also be heading down with the Moko team to check out University life and health science pathways through Nōna Te Ao in August and September. We are heading to Auckland, Waikato, Wellington and Otago, and will be hosted by our Maurice Wilkins Centre whānau with lab tours and activities.

If you are a kura that has not yet had our programme visit, feel free to email us at teaumihi@themokofoundation.com
... See MoreSee Less

Kaupapa Spotlight - Nōna Te Ao
 
Today we are highlighting Nōna Te Ao. Nōna Te Ao is the Moko Foundation’s 2024 pilot health science education programme, aimed at ages 15-17 and in partnership with the Maurice Wilkins Centre. 
 
We have developed an in school programme about 3 key health areas/concerns for our rangatahi - Antibiotic Resistance, Immunisation and Vaping & Addictions. Our team has been rolling this out through kura across Te Hiku this past term with over 100 tauira completing our programme. 
 
30 tauira from Te Hiku will also be heading down with the Moko team to check out University life and health science pathways through Nōna Te Ao in August and September. We are heading to Auckland, Waikato, Wellington and Otago, and will be hosted by our Maurice Wilkins Centre whānau with lab tours and activities. 
 
If you are a kura that has not yet had our programme visit, feel free to email us at teaumihi@themokofoundation.com

Comment on Facebook

Ngawaiata Evans ?

Scroll to Top